Peanmeanach Bothy - Take the Tour


The Peanmeanach Bothy will be renovated in the winter of 2020/early 2021. If your expectations are of matching “his and her” hand basins (or even of any hand basins at all) along with "bang on trend" furniture and decorations, please stop reading now – this is definitely not the right holiday venue for you!

Renovations to the three downstairs rooms will include painting the interior walls and installing a wood-burning stove in the sitting room. The configuration of the three downstairs rooms may alter to two rooms.

As you can see from the photos, the majority of the furniture, fixtures and fittings has been transported by boat across the loch, and carried up the beach into the bothy. 

Due to the journey that every item faced, robustness is favoured over aesthetics! As befits the property, all furniture will be second hand or upcycled to reduce our carbon footprint.  It is also unlikely that a new item would manage the journey unscathed. Whilst it may not have electricity or water, the interior of the bothy will be basic but homely - with tapestries, paintings and wood carvings on the walls, curtains, cushions, antique furniture and a well-equipped kitchen.    

 

Current Sitting Room

The sitting room measures approximately 13’ x 13’ and the walls will be repainted in the renovation.  The furniture and contents reflect those of a traditional house that has never had electricity or running water. One concession is a variety of board games (e.g. chess, scrabble, dominoes etc.) so you can while away the evening, enjoying company and the warmth of the wood burning stove.

 

Current Bedroom/Kitchen

The plan is that the lower bunk bed will remain and the kitchen table will be on the raised platform.  Cupboards installed for food, pots and pans etc.

As there is no running water or electricity there is no bathroom!

Upstairs

There is a staircase to two large upstairs rooms for sleeping, which will be refurbished in winter 2021/22.

Moving the furniture

Moving the furniture was quite a challenge, it was brought in by boat on a high tide, and carried (or wheelbarrowed) up the beach!